Black Berry

This article is about the bramble fruit, not to be confused with the tree fruit Morus nigra or the black raspberry. For the brand, see BlackBerry. For other uses, see Blackberry (disambiguation).

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.

What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) “picks with” (i.e., stays with) the fruit. When one picks a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit.

The term bramble, a word meaning any impenetrable thicket, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[3] though in the United States it applies to all members of the genus Rubus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.

The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.

Nutrients

†Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Cultivated blackberries are notable for their significant contents of dietary fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K (table). A 100 gram serving of raw blackberries supplies 43 calories and 5 grams of dietary fiber or 25% of the recommended Daily Value (DV) (table). In 100 grams, vitamin C and vitamin K contents are 25% and 19% DV, respectively, while other essential nutrients are low in content (table).

Blackberries contain both soluble and insoluble fiber components

 

 

14 Amazing Benefits

  1. Fights Free Radicals

Anthocyanocides and polyphenols are two antioxidants found in abundance in blackberries. These help in fighting free radicals (2). The collagen-forming Vitamin C and Vitamin A make it only more appropriate for skin. These vitamins also act as antioxidants. The regular consumption of blackberries protects the skin against the damaging UVA and UVB rays and aids in skin cell renewal.

  1. Hydrates Skin

Blackberries are comprised of more than 85% water with an abundant dose of fiber. Both of these are essential for a healthy-looking skin. The consumption of blackberries detoxifies the body and maintains the elasticity of the skin .

A good way to enjoy the goodness of blackberries for your skin is through a face mask.

Take a bunch of blackberries.

Crush and mix the juice with a teaspoon of honey.

Apply this to your face and neck.

Let it dry well before washing it off thoroughly.

This face mask is ideal for hydrating the skin while supplying essential nutrients to it.

  1. Rejuvenates The Skin

Vitamins A, C and K in blackberries are excellent for skin rejuvenation (4). Their omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids-rich seeds are vital for healthy skin.

Here’s an effective face mask recipe for skin rejuvenation.

Grind a bunch of blackberries.

Blend these with some fresh yoghurt.

Add a pinch of nutmeg powder and ¼ cup of lemon juice.

Apply this mask evenly on your face and neck.

Wash off after 25 to 30 minutes with lukewarm water.

The regular application of this face mask will help rejuvenate your skin. It will also ensure smooth, moisturized and hydrated skin.

  1. Skin Cleanser For Oily Skin

Blackberries are great for cleansing and detoxification of oily skin too (5).

Prepare a natural skin cleanser for oily skin with this recipe:

Mix 2 tbsp of fuller’s earth with 1 ½ tbsp of blackberry juice.

Mix well to form a thick paste.

Add a few drops of tea tree oil (only if you suffer from acne).

Dampen your face and apply this mixture evenly over your face.

Wash off after 2 minutes.

This natural skin cleanser will help remove excess oil and shrink the pores, purifying your skin from deep within.

  1. Treatment Of Wounds

Blackberry leaves contain tannins with brilliant astringent qualities (6). These prevent the formation of blood clots. Traditionally, the fruit leaves are used to heal wounds, open sores and scratches. Blackberries also assist in soothing skin ailments like psoriasis. The antioxidants aid in clearing acne. The brew made from blackberry leaves is applied topically to cure eczema.

  1. Healthy Hair

Vitamin C, found in blackberries, is largely responsible for collagen production and contributes to strong hair. The antioxidants help combat the harmful and damaging effects of the environment on the hair. The topical application of the fruit extract is known to add instant volume, shine and bounce to the hair.

  1. Gum Care

The leaves and bark of the blackberry plant are consumed traditionally. They are used to treat mild gum inflammation and bleeding gums too .

  1. Menstrual Bleeding

Consuming blackberry leaves helps get relief from excessive bleeding during menses. The fruit is also used to regulate menses and considered a uterine tonic.

  1. Dysentery

Blackberry leaves and fruit can help treat diarrhea. To use, simply boil the leaves or the fruit. Strain and drink the water to get relief .

  1. Diabetes

The high potassium content of blackberries helps reduce insulin. The daily consumption of blackberries with one teaspoon of honey helps control diabetes. For best results, it is best advised to have this for at least a week. Not only the fruit, blackberry leaves also can be consumed for their anti-diabetic properties .

  1. Healthy Bones

The decent content of calcium found in blackberries contributes in strengthening the bones.

  1. Red Blood Cells

Blackberries contain minerals like potassium, manganese, copper, and magnesium. Together, these help a great deal in producing white and red blood cells.

  1. Hemorrhoids

The pulp made from blackberry fruit is widely used to heal hemorrhoids and even conjunctivitis.

  1. Cancer

Blackberries have an antioxidant called Ellagic acid. This can help in the prevention of the growth of certain cancer cells.